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02_browsing:04_queries:03_regex

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02_browsing:04_queries:03_regex [2020/05/04 14:07]
simone
02_browsing:04_queries:03_regex [2020/05/11 08:56] (current)
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 Many different characters can occur in between your letters and digits: commas, full stops, spaces etc. Most of these characters can be used for queries like letters or numbers: Many different characters can occur in between your letters and digits: commas, full stops, spaces etc. Most of these characters can be used for queries like letters or numbers:
    * space    * space
-   ​* ​coma+   ​* ​comma
    * dash (-)    * dash (-)
    * semicolon (;)    * semicolon (;)
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    * exclamation mark (!)    * exclamation mark (!)
  
-NB: most of these characters do have a special function as well when they appear in a specific position. As you will see below, { } is one of the possible ​way to search for repeating characters. Thus, the character <{> can be recognized as a character in its own right or as a syntactic function depending on its position. The same goes for most of these characters.+NB: most of these characters do have a special function as well when they appear in a specific position. As you will see below, { } is one of the possible ​ways to search for repeating characters. Thus, the character <{> can be recognized as a character in its own right or as a syntactic function depending on its position. The same goes for most of these characters.
  
 Other separators are reserved by the RegEx syntax. To use them by their ordinary value, you have to place a backslash in front of them. Thus, you type in ''/​m\*n/''​ to look for //m*n//. These characters are: Other separators are reserved by the RegEx syntax. To use them by their ordinary value, you have to place a backslash in front of them. Thus, you type in ''/​m\*n/''​ to look for //m*n//. These characters are:
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 Example: Example:
 ''/​h+a+l+o+/''​ ''/​h+a+l+o+/''​
-will find all variants of hallo+will find all variants of //hallo//
  
  
02_browsing/04_queries/03_regex.1588594054.txt.gz · Last modified: 2020/05/11 08:55 (external edit)